Blockchain and GDPR

Good Day! This is my weekly newsletter, with a dose of insights into the future. The topic of this newsletter is the exponential times we live in, hence the title of f(x) = e^x, which is the (natural) exponential function.

Recently, I launched my new concept The Digital Speaker and you can now book me as an avatar or hologram. Also, my tech trend prediction for 2021 is out, read it here!


How Blockchain and GDPR Could Work Together

My latest article:

In an era where data privacy is an increasing concern, blockchain technology is moving toward a more transparent and more verifiable security model. Blockchain is a decentralised database where any data stored is read and write and not editable. As such, any data is immutable, verifiable and traceable. That puts blockchain in direct opposition to the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). With regulations pushing for more consumer control of personal data, can blockchain technology work within this new GDPR framework?


Three Useful Nuggets of Information

My weekly tips from around the web to get you thinking.

1. Can blockchain fix Facebook? IBM thinks so.

As the Facebook / Cambridge Analytical scandal made clear, Facebook has a problem with data security and data privacy. Two problems that can be solved with blockchain. At least, that is what IBM thinks and Facebook as well, as they are investigating the potential of blockchain. (Fortune)

2. Blockchain is a crappy technology.

You read that correctly. There are still people who believe that blockchain is a fad and a crappy technology and a bad vision for the future. It is of course absolutely possible and allowed to think so, though it may be clear that I disagree. (Medium)

3. Let’s ship a helicopter to Mars!

The American space agency NASA came up with an exciting project; sending a small rotorcraft to Mars to explore the red planet in a completely new way. However, flying on Mars is difficult, let alone getting a helicopter to Mars, so there are still plenty of challenges to overcome. (NY Times)


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