Building Better Manufacturing with Blockchain

Good Day! This is my weekly newsletter, with a dose of insights into the future. The topic of this newsletter is the exponential times we live in, hence the title of f(x) = e^x, which is the (natural) exponential function.

Recently, I launched my new concept The Digital Speaker and you can now book me as an avatar or hologram. Also, my tech trend prediction for 2021 is out, read it here!


Building Better Manufacturing with Blockchain

My latest article:

Blockchain started out as a purely financial technology but has shown surprisingly expansive potential into other industries with the release of add-ons like smart contracts and tokenisation. In manufacturing, an immutable data trail can have value in a variety of functions ranging from supply chain management and logistics to production. With sensors becoming an integrated part of every manufacturing plant, collecting, understanding, manipulating and leveraging that data holds tremendous potential value for those on the production side of the supply chain, allowing organisations to improve their manufacturing activities.​


Three Useful Nuggets of Information

My weekly tips from around the web to get you thinking.

1. The majority of ICOs fail, within four months.

A new study has revealed that 56% of the ICOs done since January 2017 have failed within four months of their token sale. However, the research should be taken with a grain of salt, as the researchers looked only at the Twitter feeds of the companies and no tweets meant that the company is dead. (Coindesk)

2. China warns against mythologising Blockchain.

The China Banking and Insurance Regulatory Commission has stated that although Blockchain is an “innovation with a significant meaning”, it should be avoided to mythologise the technology because multi-entry bookkeeping has existed already for hundreds of years. (Cointelegraph)

3. How AI can help prevent natural disasters

It seems climate changing is causing increasingly more havoc as natural disasters are occurring more often. However, researchers have developed AI that can predict natural disasters and help plan and prepare for these events. (Wired)


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