Augmenting Your Career with AI - Interview with David Shrier – The Digital Speaker series EP15

Augmenting Your Career with AI -  Interview with David Shrier – The Digital Speaker series EP15

In the latest episode of The Digital Speaker series, The Digital Speaker interviews David Shrier. David Shrier is CEO and co-founder of Esme Learning and a leading AI futurist who has driven $9 billion worth of technology initiatives for Fortune 1000 companies and private equity. Shrier currently holds an appointment as Professor of Practice (AI and Innovation) at Imperial College Business School, and he is a former MIT New Ventures Officer and lecturer at the MIT Media Lab.

We covered a wide range of topics related to David’s latest book: “Augmenting Your Career: How to Win at Work in the Age of AI”, including how to create ethical AI, how we can create human-machine symbiosis and whether we will ever merge with AI, why UX is so important when creating AI and why a philosopher makes an excellent AI programmer.

So, what are we waiting for? It is time to start today’s digital download.

You can either view the episode above or view it on Vimeo, YouTube or listen to it on Anchor.fm, Soundcloud or Spotify.

The following companies, books and articles were discussed:

Jelmer de Vos

Head of PSA University , Global PSA

“Mark masters the art of turning something complex into something very accessible. Right from the start he got everyone involved in his story.”
Dr Mark van Rijmenam
Dr Mark van Rijmenam

Dr Mark van Rijmenam is The Digital Speaker and available for (virtual) keynotes in-person or as avatar or hologram. He is the Founder of Datafloq and Mavin. Van Rijmenam is the author of the three best-selling management books, including The Organisation of Tomorrow, which discusses how AI, blockchain and analytics turn your business into a data organisation. He holds PhD in management from the University of Technology Sydney on how organizations should deal with Big Data, Blockchain and (Responsible) AI and he is the publisher of the ‘f(x) = ex‘ newsletter read by thousands of executives.

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