The f(x) = e^x | AI ethics and de-aging software

Good Day! This is my weekly newsletter, with a dose of insights into the future. The topic of this newsletter is the exponential times we live in, hence the title of f(x) = e^x, which is the (natural) exponential function.

You can visit The Digital Speaker to book me as a keynote speaker for your next event or to hire me as a future tech coach for your CEO. I have also published my trend predictions for 2022.

AI Ethics: What Is It and How to Embed Trust in AI?

My latest article:

The recent launch of OpenAI's ChatGPT, a large language model capable of dialogue of unprecedented accuracy, shows how fast AI is moving forward. It also shows the need for artificial intelligence that we can trust.

AI developing at breakneck speed will significantly impact society and business. We will see new types of intelligent machines with many different applications and use cases. More than ever, we must establish ethical standards and values for these applications of AI to ensure that they are useful and trustworthy. We must do so today.

Trust, at the foundation of society, is a cornerstone of AI ethics. Four essential elements contribute to trust: credibility, predictability, intuitiveness, and responsibility. We need to incorporate these concepts into AI to embed trust in AI and ensure a positive impact on society.


Useful Nuggets of Information

My weekly tips from around the web to get you thinking.

1. Musk plans to save humanity by exploring the brain's shortcuts.

Neuralink, the brain-computer interface company founded by billionaire entrepreneur Elon Musk, may begin human trials for its novel wireless device within six months. The company is developing brain chip interfaces that will enable disabled patients to communicate and move. Recently, Neuralink has been conducting trials on animals while seeking approval for clinical trials in humans—generating controversy about the purpose of these tests. (The Guardian)

2. VR helps medical students be better doctors.

Training future doctors is a serious business—so it’s no surprise that Imperial College London has turned to virtual reality (VR) as part of its curriculum. Medical students wear headsets to experience emergencies like cardiac arrests and asthma attacks, then make decisions based on what they've learned. The university hopes this experience will help students prepare better for their careers as healthcare providers. (BBC)

3. 3D printed violins: the latest in music technology 🎻

Thanks to The Acoustical Society of America's AVIVA Young Artists Program, aspiring musicians and music students will meet their low-cost and durable needs by playing a 3D-printed violin. Next, the group plans to explore ways to make these instruments more widely available—especially in education. (Interesting Engineering)

4. Watch Disney’s new software de-age actors.

Disney researchers have created software that can take on some VFX tasks to reduce the time spent in postproduction. In a paper published by Disney Research Studios, it is explained that FRAN (which stands for "face re-aging network") is trained using a database containing pairs of randomly generated synthetic faces at varying levels, which solves the inevitable problems associated with tracking down real images of humans taken over time. (The Verge)


The Step into the Metaverse Podcast!

A few months ago, I published my fourth book, Step into the Metaverse, which is meant as a blueprint for an open metaverse. As part of this book, I did nearly 100 in-depth interviews with the stakeholders building the open metaverse. I have turned a selection of these interviews into a new podcast, called ‘Step into the Metaverse’, and the next three episodes are live now! Subscribe on Spotify or Apple to be notified when the next episodes are released.

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